Rabbit by Ronald Koh

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Ronald Koh is an origami designer from Singapore who has been coming up with very nice designs for the last thirty or so years.  He recently completed a new design for a rabbit.  It is a great model to fold, and there is a nice rhythm to the folding.  The design allows for a lot of flexibility in posing the rabbit.  Here’s my take on it.

Designed by Ronald Koh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sorry, diagram and crease pattern are not available.

 

 

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The Origami Stent

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Preparing for a talk. I read up more about the applications of origami.  One device that is origami-based is the medical stent.  In June 2003, Zhong You and Kaori Kuribayashi presented a paper entitled A Novel Origami Stent(1).  Stents are tubes that are inserted into the body e.g. in the gastrointestinal tract or blood vessel to dilate it and/or provide support.

The requirement is for a stent to be small so that it is easier to insert, and capable of expanding to a bigger diameter at the chosen site.  Expanding stents were previously made from metal wire mesh covering a frame.  The researchers were looking for a device made from one integrated unit.  They hit upon the idea of using origami to design this.  The final design was presented at the 2003 Summer Bioengineering Conference.  This has now been made into a medical product.  A picture of a stent before and after it is deployed is shown on the left.

Photo credit: World-Science.net

The origami design of the stent is based on a grid of water-bombs.  The basic pattern is shown below:

Crease Pattern for Stent

If you pre-crease the waterbomb-based crease pattern and collapse it, the result is an origami stent.  (The origami stent is cylindrical while the medical stent is helical in design, but the basic idea is the same).  The photos below show the stent in the collapsed and in the (partially) expanded form.  (Note : I used a 8 x 16 grid for the model, the pattern above is a 3 x 4 grid).

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The Origami Stent

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The Origami Stent (partially expanded)

I was rather intrigued that this pattern is basically the same as that for the Origami Magic Ball, which I wrote about in my previous post.  You can see this from the pictures below, which showed the Origami Magic Ball before and after expansion.

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Collapsed Origami Magic Ball

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The Origami Magic Ball

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Happy folding!

(1)  Zhong You and Kaori Kuribayashi “A Novel Origami Stent” 2003 Summer Bioengineering Conference

Origami Magic Ball

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I made the Origami Magic Ball a few years ago.  I recently chanced upon it in YouTube and decided to make this model again.  It is a design attributed to Kade Chan.

The Origami Magic Ball is made from a 2 x 1 rectangle.  Many of the YouTube tutorials choose a 32 x 8 grid to start with, but the crease pattern I had from years ago used a 40 x 10 grid.  I tried both, and prefer the ball made from the 40 x 10 grid as it makes a rounder ball with more details.  You can see the difference in the two pictures below.  For a beginner, it may be easier to start with a 32 x 8 grid as it is easier to pre-crease the grid.  This is a PDF file of a 40 x 10 grid.

magic ball grid1

The two Magic Origami Balls are shown in the pictures below.

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Origami Magic Ball – 8 levels/ Designed by Yuri Shumakov

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Origami Magic Ball – 10 levels/ Designed by Yuri Shumakov

Since the tutorials are easily available on the internet, I will not repeat any instructions here.  Suffice to say that the creases must be accurate to achieve a regularly-shaped ball.  I used thick paper rather than card, as paper is easier to pre-crease and there’s lots of it to do.  But you do need to use stiff paper so that the ball can retain its shape.

Have fun!

Origami box with lid – one piece

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I am starting this blog to share my origami journey.  A few days ago, I saw a one-piece gift box with lid that was shared by Anine Christensen in the Origami list.  (Video link here).  It was an elegant design.  Intrigued, I did some reverse engineering.  From the video, the 45 degree lines that made up the twist that will put the lid in place were clearly shown.   Some lines were added to make the overhanging lid.  Twist folds were added at the bottom to make the base.  The final box can be seen below.

box with lid on

This view shows the box when it is open.  The diagonal folds can be seen from this.

This is a view of the inside of the box.

For those who like a crease pattern of the box, please click  Box with lid.  To fold the box, start with the base part tucked inside the box and slowly tease the 45 degree pieces out.  Also, if you examine the video, you can see additional lines added to the 45 degree twists near the lid.  Add these on to facilitate opening and closing the box.