Welcoming the Year of the Goat

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The lunar new year falls on 19 Feb this year, ushering in the Year of the Goat.  The goat is the eighth of 12 animals making up the Chinese zodiac.  People born in the Year of the Goat are supposed to be gentle, amicable and have a strong sense of justice.  The Chinese character for goat (羊) is a generic one, and can stand for either a mountain goat or sheep.  Conventional wisdom is that there were no sheep in China in the past, so the goat is usually chosen.  It is also a more spritely animal.

I have been folding an origami animal to make an e-card every year since 2010.  This year, I folded 2 designs.  The first is a 2-piece design by  Akira Yoshizawa folded from a bird base, which I chose to use for me e-card.  You can see it here.

Goat – design by Akira Yoshizawa

The other design which I liked was the goat designed by Jun Maekawa.  It is a stout and majestic animal.  Here’s the completed model.

Goat - designed by Jun Maekawa

Goat – design by Jun Maekawa

Happy Year of the Goat!

Origami box with lid revisited

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I posted an article on a one-piece Origami box with lid 2 years ago.

Yesterday, at a meeting of the Origami Singapore group, my friend Francis Ow alerted me to another design of an origami box with lid.  It was an elegant model designed by Angel Ecija Blanco.  Here’s it:

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The walls of the box at the top folds up nicely to form the cover.  That was a neat idea.

The Lady and the Tramp

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I recently folded 2 figures – a Lady and a Tramp.  Both are box-pleated models.  The Lady strikes an elegant pose, while the tramp looks lively and quirky.

The Lady is designed by Nguyen Nguyen Thong, and can be found it VOG2 in the Passion Origami Collection.  It is a 32 x 32 box pleat.  This is the model:

ladyThe Lady designed by Nguyen Nguyen Thong

The Tramp is a dwarf designed by Eric Joisel.  The CP is available in Eric Joisel : The Magician of Origami.  It is a 28 x 28 box pleated model.

The dwarf by Eric Joisel

The dwarf by Eric Joisel

I look forward to folding the musicians designed in a similar vein as the dwarf, though it will be quite a challenge (to me at least).

 

Welcoming the Year of the Horse

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I am partial to horses, since I am born under that Chinese zodiac sign.  To prepare for the Year of the Horse, I reprised the origami horses I folded before.  One of the earlier ones was Anibal Voyer’s horse, since diagrams were then hard to come by and this one was available on the internet.  And it was good.  Since then, another model I came to like was Issei Yoshino’s horse with its majestic pose, reminding me of a Tang dynasty ceramic horse.

For the upcoming new year, I have been re-folding some of the models I liked.  One of them is the design by Hideo Komatsu, which I portrayed in fiery Chinese New Year red.

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Horse designed by Hideo Komatsu

And for an ecard I planned to make, I decided to fold a tableau of horses based on Roman Diaz’s design.  Here’s the outcome:

Designed by Roman Diaz

Designed by Roman Diaz

In the days leading up to the Chinese New Year, I worked with a local production house which was producing a stop-motion video for a client to mark the festive season.  Here’s a link to the video, courtesy of the production house.

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(Click on the picture to view video)

Happy New Year!

Origami : From Traditional to Modern

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Facebook banner designed by Ng Boon Choon

Facebook banner designed by Ng Boon Choon

The Origami Singapore group organised a curated exhibition which concluded last month.  Titled “Origami : From Traditional to Modern”, the exhibition traced the development of origami from a traditional craft to the cutting edge designs of today.  There were more than 200 models on display.  The exhibition was held for about 3 months, from 8 Sep to 29 Nov.  The exhibits travelled to 3 different locations of the National Library, and the exhibition was kindly supported by the National Library Board.  The aim of the exhibition was to showcase origami in Singapore to the public, and encourage interest in origami in Singapore.

Setting up at Sengkang library

Setting up at Sengkang library

The “traditional” section featured models that were traditionally folded in Singapore.  More than 30 models were on display, including the sampan, dragon head, yacht, jumping frog, shirt/trousers, mandarin hat and shuriken, to name a few.  It was well received by the public and brought back fond memories to the older generation, many of whom were familiar with the models.

Traditional models on display

Traditional models on display

The section on “intermediate” models featured mostly models designed in the 60s to 80s, and included geometric and modular pieces.  The “complex origami” section was the best represented.  It showcased designers from all over the world, and many of the models featured were their latest designs, which thanks to the internet were already well known among Singaporean folders.

Fantasy models

Fantasy models

Special mention must be made of the showcase of designs by Singaporean folders, which were of a high quality.

Models by local designers

Models by local designers

The exhibition also featured models folded by young folders under 20, including two who are below 10 years.  Workshops for the public were conducted at all 3 locations.

Public workshop

Public workshop

Here are some more photographs from the exhibition.

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At Toa Payoh library

Display cases

Display cases

Display cases

Display cases

Vistors at Sengkang library

Vistors at Sengkang library

L to R : Pek Tiong Boon, Wil Chua, Francis Ow, Chan Yew Meng, Ronald Koh, Curtis Choy

Setting up at Toa Payoh Library – some of the volunteers: (L to R : Pek Tiong Boon, Wil Chua, Francis Ow, Chan Yew Meng, Ronald Koh, Curtis Choy)

A trio of eagles

A trio of eagles

Hope to upload more photographs when I have sorted them out.

Welcoming the Year of the Snake

It has been my practice to fold the Chinese zodiac animal for the lunar new year. This year, the lunar new year starts on 10 Feb, and it will be the Year of the Snake.

I thought a great model to represent the Year of the Snake would be the King Cobra by my friend Ronald Koh. It really shows the majesty of the cobra. It wasn’t an easy model to fold – it has about 500 scales and its final length was about 3 feet. Here is the snake in all its glory:

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This model first made its appearance in the Sentosa Giant Paperland exhibition on Sentosa (in Singapore) in 1991. It was a combined effort of many origami folders in Singapore, led by Ronald Koh. Here’s a snapshot:

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Happy folding!

Rose, Sundial and Pine Cone

What do a rose, a sundial and a pine cone have in common?
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In origami, you can form all of them from the same basic design.  Specifically, they are folded from the same fractal design.  A fractal is an object that is made from a self-similar pattern, that is, as you zoom into one part of the object you can see the same pattern repeated there in greater detail.
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Andrea’s rose is an origami “rose” designed by JC Nolan.  Diagrams for it are available in the internet.  This is the rose – you can see the repeating pattern as you “zoom in”:
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Andreaś roseAndrea’s Rose – designed by JC Nolan
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There is a pine cone I folded from a design by Kunihiko Kasahara that can be found in his book “Origami for the Connoisseur” published in 1987.  I have had this pine cone for more than 20 years and it still looks good as you can see from this photo that was taken today.  I thought the design was “cool”.  And as is obvious, the face  of the pine cone is an Andrea’s rose.

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pine cone
 Pine cone – designed by Kunihiko Kasahara
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There was a mention of the sundial by Christine Edison in the Origami list recently, which led me to fold it and write this post.  I tracked the sundial down in the internet and managed to fold it with the aid of the photo diagrams published by Edison.  And, lo and behold, it is based on the same fractal design.  However, in her design Edison has added additional petal folds and turned it into a pretty eight-pointed star.  (Look for the square in the centre, it corresponds to that found in Andrea’s rose)  I had much pleasure folding it.  Here it is:
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sundial
 Sundial by Christine Edison
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In the Origami list posting I referred to above, Meenakshi Mukerjee mentioned her fractal Sakura (here).  She also mentioned the Hydrangea by Shuzo Fujimoto, a wonderful design which you can see from the picture below:
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hydrangea
Hydrangea by Shuzo Fujimoto
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Have fun with fractals and tessellations – there are lots of diagrams available on the internet.

Rabbit by Ronald Koh

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Ronald Koh is an origami designer from Singapore who has been coming up with very nice designs for the last thirty or so years.  He recently completed a new design for a rabbit.  It is a great model to fold, and there is a nice rhythm to the folding.  The design allows for a lot of flexibility in posing the rabbit.  Here’s my take on it.

Designed by Ronald Koh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sorry, diagram and crease pattern are not available.

 

 

The Origami Stent

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Preparing for a talk. I read up more about the applications of origami.  One device that is origami-based is the medical stent.  In June 2003, Zhong You and Kaori Kuribayashi presented a paper entitled A Novel Origami Stent(1).  Stents are tubes that are inserted into the body e.g. in the gastrointestinal tract or blood vessel to dilate it and/or provide support.

The requirement is for a stent to be small so that it is easier to insert, and capable of expanding to a bigger diameter at the chosen site.  Expanding stents were previously made from metal wire mesh covering a frame.  The researchers were looking for a device made from one integrated unit.  They hit upon the idea of using origami to design this.  The final design was presented at the 2003 Summer Bioengineering Conference.  This has now been made into a medical product.  A picture of a stent before and after it is deployed is shown on the left.

Photo credit: World-Science.net

The origami design of the stent is based on a grid of water-bombs.  The basic pattern is shown below:

Crease Pattern for Stent

If you pre-crease the waterbomb-based crease pattern and collapse it, the result is an origami stent.  (The origami stent is cylindrical while the medical stent is helical in design, but the basic idea is the same).  The photos below show the stent in the collapsed and in the (partially) expanded form.  (Note : I used a 8 x 16 grid for the model, the pattern above is a 3 x 4 grid).

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The Origami Stent

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The Origami Stent (partially expanded)

I was rather intrigued that this pattern is basically the same as that for the Origami Magic Ball, which I wrote about in my previous post.  You can see this from the pictures below, which showed the Origami Magic Ball before and after expansion.

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Collapsed Origami Magic Ball

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The Origami Magic Ball

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Happy folding!

(1)  Zhong You and Kaori Kuribayashi “A Novel Origami Stent” 2003 Summer Bioengineering Conference

Origami Magic Ball

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I made the Origami Magic Ball a few years ago.  I recently chanced upon it in YouTube and decided to make this model again.  It is a design attributed to Kade Chan.

The Origami Magic Ball is made from a 2 x 1 rectangle.  Many of the YouTube tutorials choose a 32 x 8 grid to start with, but the crease pattern I had from years ago used a 40 x 10 grid.  I tried both, and prefer the ball made from the 40 x 10 grid as it makes a rounder ball with more details.  You can see the difference in the two pictures below.  For a beginner, it may be easier to start with a 32 x 8 grid as it is easier to pre-crease the grid.  This is a PDF file of a 40 x 10 grid.

magic ball grid1

The two Magic Origami Balls are shown in the pictures below.

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Origami Magic Ball – 8 levels/ Designed by Yuri Shumakov

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Origami Magic Ball – 10 levels/ Designed by Yuri Shumakov

Since the tutorials are easily available on the internet, I will not repeat any instructions here.  Suffice to say that the creases must be accurate to achieve a regularly-shaped ball.  I used thick paper rather than card, as paper is easier to pre-crease and there’s lots of it to do.  But you do need to use stiff paper so that the ball can retain its shape.

Have fun!